All posts tagged: North Carolina

Pisgah Covered Bridge

I discovered the Pisgah covered bridge during a drive home from Asheboro, NC in 2017. It wound up being the silver lining of an accidental decision to take country roads home instead of the highway. This may have resulted in spending an extra hour in the car, but it was scenic, and when I spotted the sign for the bridge, I had to pull over and investigate. Pisgah covered bridge was built in 1911 to allow horses and carriages to cross the Little River. Eventually surpassed by more modern roadways, the bridge was designated a historical landmark in 1998. It later became the focus of a major preservation project in 2003 when a flood washed the bridge away. Fortunately, it was reconstructed with 90 percent of the original wood rescued from the river. Today the bridge is still accessible from the road and visitor friendly. There are picnic tables, and a short trail that loops from one side of the bridge to the other.

An old question from a Heroes Convention: If you could be any villain, who would it be, and why? 

In anticipation of conventions returning to North Carolina this summer, I’m revisiting an old post from 2017’s Heroes Convention in Charlotte. I would also like to revisit a question I posed when it was originally published: If you could be any villain, who would it be, and why? Keep in mind that isn’t the same as asking who your favorite villain is. As one panelist from the 2017 con, Dr. Michael Critzer, pointed out, “I love Darth Vader, but being Darth Vader would suck.” I would have chosen Alice from the BBC show Luther in 2017. I might have to reconsider my choice though, as Alice got a lot less likable in the final season of the show in 2019. Perhaps Dr. Hannibal Lecter from Silence of the Lambs would be a good choice. ******** Last weekend I attended the Heroes Convention here in Charlotte, NC. I’m just starting to get into reading comics and graphic novels, so I wasn’t originally planning on attending. However, I lucked into free tickets at the last minute, so …

Exploring Otter Falls in Seven Devils

When my husband and I approached the start of the trail that takes visitors to Otter Falls, we encountered a mother and her daughter at the end of their hike, huffing and out of breath. “Have you been before?” the mother asked. “No,” we answered. “Its definitely worth it!” she assured us. Given that the trail is under a mile long, her reassurances seemed strange, until we realized how steep the drop in elevation to reach the falls actually was. She was right though, it was worth it.

Daniel Stowe Botanical Garden (Chinese Lantern Festival)

I’ve visited the Daniel Stowe Botanical Garden many times to escape into it’s captivating displays of exotic flowers and soothing water features, but this visit in 2017 is one of my favorites. A special collection of Chinese Lanterns was layered in between the flowers and foliage, creating a whimsical and colorful atmosphere. The lanterns were created in Zigong China,where the tradition of lantern festivals was born, and then carefully transported to North Carolina for display. Along with traditional silk lanterns, the collection also featured elaborate elephant statues constructed from Chinese teacups, and a peacock sculpture constructed from recycled pill bottles filled with colored water. Visit my instagram feed (everyday.strange) to watch a video of its elaborate display in motion! Usually when I am snapping pictures at an event, I try to eliminate people from my shots as much as possible. This time however, I couldn’t help letting a few children slip into my photos. They definitely help capture the scale, whimsy, and humor in the lanterns shaped as all sorts of creatures, from snails to …

It’s Quiet Uptown

No New Year’s Eve celebrations are planned here in Charlotte this year, due to the 10pm curfew in place. I typically spend the evening at home in my pajamas, but I will miss watching the typical crowds celebrating in New York City as the ball drops in Times Square.

24 Hours in a Flood Plain (A Cautionary Tale)

Reposting this account of an ill fated trip to Myrtle beach a few years ago. I know for many there is an urge to rush back to pre-COVID activities for a sense of normalcy. I can definitely sympathize, I almost became stranded in a flood zone because I didn’t want to give up a much anticipated beach weekend after a major hurricane passed over the area I was traveling to. Trust me, ignoring warnings and red flags for a trip, a party, or other high risk activity is not worth it. ***** I wish I could say the above picture was from a quiet weekend at Myrtle Beach, spent relaxing on the beach and catching up on submissions. Unfortunately, it was the single bright moment in a 24 hour nightmare. I scheduled my trip to Myrtle beach back in late July, long before hurricane Florence was even a rainstorm. I even added trip insurance to my hotel booking, well aware that September is an active month for hurricanes. The week before left, I had confirmed …

Evergreen Park and Cemetery

Last week I posted a poem I entered into an International Peace Day themed contest (you can vote for it here!) I mentioned in that post that my poem was partially inspired by a walk through a cemetery adjacent to a nature park. The cemetery was Evergreen Cemetery, right next to Evergreen Park. Evergreen Park is small, but serene, and one of its paths joins the walkways in the cemetery. This may sound strange, but I actually like walking through cemeteries. When I was in grade school, I went on numerous field trips to the old graveyards in my small Massachusetts hometown. We noted the years and months during which people died, identified life spans by looking at the dates on head stones and then coming up with averages, and noted who was buried with family, and who was not. My favorite part was taking rubbings of the artwork on the headstones, and looking up the symbolism of different images later. All of this was an effort to teach us how history is studied, the …

Chicken of the… Woods?

I spotted this large bloom of fungi just off my neighborhood trail after a heavy rainstorm. I had never seen anything like them before. A quick google search revealed that it is a large shelf mushroom known as Chicken of the Woods, which is actually used by some as a chicken substitute. Who knew?