All posts tagged: history

Muse of the Day

General Order No. 3, announcing the total emancipation of slaves, in Galveston, Texas on June 19th, 1865, freeing the last slaves in America two years after the Emancipation Proclamation was issued: The people of Texas are informed that, in accordance with a proclamation from the Executive of the United States, all slaves are free. This involves an absolute equality of personal rights and rights of property between former masters and slaves, and the connection heretofore existing between them becomes that between employer and hired labor. The freedmen are advised to remain quietly at their present homes and work for wages. They are informed that they will not be allowed to collect at military posts and that they will not be supported in idleness either there or elsewhere.

Mélancolie

After listening to the wistful and nostalgic tone of Francis Poulenc’s Mélancolie, it may not surprise you to know that it was composed in 1940, while Poulenc was living in war torn France. This performance is by Neil Rutman for Noontime Concerts, which streams a new concert from its archives every Tuesday at 12:30.

Ocmulgee Mounds National Park

Earlier this month, as the impeding pandemic was just looming on the horizon in the US, my husband and I were traveling through Georgia. We stopped in Macon for an overnight stay, intending to continue on to Florida the next day. Ultimately we made the decision to turn around and return home the next day as news of the coronavirus’s spread intensified. We were however, fortunate enough to visit the Ocmulgee Mounds National Park before heading home. Fittingly, it is a testament to the resilience of humanity, as the park is home to a pre-historic American Indian site. Occupied by many different cultures for thousands of years, the Mounds were constructed around 900 CE, during the Mississippian era for tribal elites. Normally I would edit down the large amount of photos I take during a visit to a park or event, but since many of us are stuck inside and unable to travel, I decided to include more then usual, to create a virtual tour of sorts.

Edison and Ford Winter Estates

My visit to the Edison Ford Winter Estates was a last minute decision designed to fill time while visiting my in-laws in Florida. Since I hadn’t done any research in advance, all I expected to see was a few historical homes, and maybe an antique car or two. It turns out, Henry Ford and Thomas Edison bought these neighboring homes on the Caloosahatchee River in the late 1920s to work with Henry Firestone on a very specific project. They were concerned with the Unites States’ dependence on foreign rubber, and were determined to find a plant that could be cultivated in the US, allowing for the production of domestic rubber. They constructed a laboratory on the land shared by Edison and Ford, and brought in plants from all over the world to test. Eventually they discovered a plant, goldenrod, that would work. Today the homes on the estate are preserved, along with the laboratory and 21 acre botanical garden created from all of the plants that were tested during the project. There is also a …

Flashback Friday

As Charlotte slowly thaws out from winter, I’m looking back at some of the places I explored last year, and planning new excursions. Around this time last year, I visited Körner’s Folly, a historical home in North Carolina in the midst of a renovation. It was a fascinating visit, and I’m looking for more places like it to see this year. So far I have my eye on a massive greenhouse, a few battlefields, and the glaciers in Alaska. Stay tuned!

Auld Lang Syne

By the time this is posted New Years Eve celebrations will be well underway around the world, and no song will be more played during them than Auld Lang Syne. Originally a Scottish poem set to the tune of a traditional folk song, it became a Scottish tradition to sing on New Years Eve, funerals, and at the close of other events. As Scots emigrated to other parts of the world, they took the tradition with them. Guy Lombardo and His Royal Canadians played Auld Lang Syne at Times Square from 1939-1977, and is credited by many with popularizing the tradition in the US. His version is still played in Times Square after the ball drops every year.