All posts tagged: art

This Bitter Earth

This short film, a continuous shot of Sara Mearns and Adrian Danchig-Waring performing an excerpt of the now canceled production of This Bitter Earth, was filmed during the eve of the pandemic. The music is a mash up of “On the Nature of Daylight” performed by Max Richter and “This Bitter Earth” performed by Dinah Washington.

The On Ice Perspective

I have to give my sister credit for sending me this video of figure skater Adam Rippon performing to Beyoncé’s Otherside. What sets it apart from the other figure skating I’ve seen is the “on ice perspective,” filming close to the skater in order to create a more intimate way to experience the routine. Adam Rippon is so captivating here, I didn’t notice until viewing a second time that there are no jumps, only footwork and spins. View this post on Instagram Everything going on in the world right now can feel scary/weird but @beyonce always makes things better. Stay safe everyone 🌎❤️ This was filmed by @oniceperspectives – who always kills it Choreography is from the literally amazing @corderozuckerman 🙆🏼‍♂️🙆🏼‍♂️🙆🏼‍♂️ A post shared by Adam Rippon (@adaripp) on Mar 19, 2020 at 1:08pm PDT

Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum

The Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum is a place I can visit over and over again. Named after the woman who spent her life collecting the art within it, and commissioned the unique building it is housed in. She personally oversaw the construction of the museum in Boston’s Fens neighborhood and personally arranged all of the artwork. When she passed away in 1924, her will stipulated that nothing in the museum’s galleries would be changed, and no items be acquired or sold from the collection. The museum is known internationally for the shocking theft of 13 paintings by renowned artists such as Rembrandt, Vermeer, Manet, and Degas in 1990. One of the stolen paintings was Rembrandt’s Christ in the Storm on the Sea of Galilee (his only known seascape.) If you visit, you will see the empty frames the paintings were cut out of still on display. Visitors can only take pictures of the museum’s intricate courtyard and gardens, but it’s Instagram account shares works of art, museum events, and pages from Isabella’s many journals.